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VIR(US)

Released on Amazon 24 Sept 2020

‘VIR(US)’ is a story set in 2032 when the earth is hit by another pandemic but this time it’s fatal, rendering the planet uninhabitable, leaving the sky the only safe place to be aboard an airplane. The story is divided into 2 parts told through chapters that alternate and finally meet at the end.

Story A is told from the perspective of the protagonist Mike who is seated by the window with his stepdaughter beside him. Staring out at the thousands of other planes all escaping from the virus, watching them fall from the sky when the fuel finally runs out he reflects on his own personal journey and thoughts about humanity: our successes, our failures, the political state of things, consumerism, love, death, family, how our societies function, the reasons for why he and others are in this situation, and of course worrying about his wife and son on a different plane.

Story B is the backstory of the rise of the virus and its virulence throughout the world, told in the third person about Mike and his family and their perilous journey leading the reader up to Story A where we find Mike sitting by the window in the plane.

The big question is, when will the fuel on his plane finally run dry…

Emotive and engaging, modern life and what it means to lose it.

This was a book of two halves for me, one was the very real and engaging human reaction to the stories anchor, a new pandemic in 2032, more fatal and with devastating mortality rate. A real page turner.

The second was the internal machinations of a highly philosophical mind, I can relate to that, the critique was on point.

The dialogue and reflection of modern life, love, family and togetherness were very sincere and readable, the insight into the authors world views, well, it was very in depth critique actually, took us on a scathing roller-coaster hitting out at the changing landscape of humanities influences, interactions and values.

At times I found this got in the way of the story, Having said that I related to these views wholeheartedly.